Category Archives: Corona

Getting our Plans Changed

Dear Folks,
We have plans. God has better plans. The message is not to forbid making our plans, but
to be ready for something different without warning.
David wanted to build a temple to the Lord.
We are not told anything in the Bible about what Mary did before the Angel Gabriel came
to her, except that she was a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph of the house of David
and that she was in Nazareth (Luke 1:26-27). We can probably expect she would have had
hopes and dreams for the future. She certainly would not have expected what
happened. She said yes without knowing what was involved but having a good idea it
would not be easy.
Throughout the Bible, we see God calling people, and it generally comes as a surprise.
Whatever plans they had needed to change drastically. Very often, they didn’t think it was a
good idea at first, but responding in obedience, they would go on to greatness.
Look at the call of Abram, later called Abraham (Genesis 12). We know almost nothing
about Abram before he is called. We don’t know what his understanding of God was, or
what he was like as a person, only that he and his wife Sarai had no children (Gen 11). He
is called to go to a place he has never seen. He is promised a land, a people and a
blessing. He packs up and goes, just like that. He will demonstrate heroic faithfulness to
God and be rewarded. It will not, however, be a smooth trip, and he will make mistakes
along the way.
Moses is called to go back to Egypt after escaping from there, running for his life. (Exodus
3 and 4). He doesn’t think it’s a good idea, and he figures he is not the right man for the
job. He doesn’t think Pharaoh has any reason to listen to him (not an unreasonable concern,
although when you are talking to a flaming bush, that sort of reframes your sense of
“reasonable”). The Pharaoh is a difficult customer, but his far greater hardship comes from
the people of Israel, even as he is saving them.
Gideon (Judges 6) is called to lead the fight against Midian, but he thinks he’s the last one
for the job.
David (1 Samuel 16 and 17) is called in stages. He is anointed by Samuel, and then
becomes harpist for King Saul, then armor-bearer. He volunteers against all expectations to
fight Goliath, and then there’s a long story and he becomes king. He will get a lot of
earthly reward, but also a lot of hardship. He will fail God very badly but will come back
from that failure to be a great part of God’s plan.
Isaiah (Isaiah 6) is unusual in the group in that he responds eagerly.
Jeremiah (Jeremiah 1) really doesn’t want the job and doesn’t think he’s ready but
responds. He has a very hard time and suffers much for his faithfulness.
Matthew (Matthew 9:9-13) is one nobody would have expected, but he comes along
readily.
Saul, later called Paul (Acts 9) was even more unlikely than Matthew. He is a mighty force
but going in the wrong direction. He gets knocked to the ground and blinded, but he does a
hundred- and eighty-degree turn.
All of these people find hardship, danger, frustration and hostility in the course of their
work. They have one other thing in common: their sacrifice mattered; it made a
difference. We rejoice gratefully for the gifts they have given to us, the parts they played in
God’s plan.
It is beyond cliché that 2020 has messed up a lot of people’s plans. In the light of this
reflection, can we see ways God has called us? What might He be calling us to do
now? What might He be calling us to learn?
Blessings,
Fr. Jim

Charitable Discussion

venn diagram

Right now there’s some really important conversation going on, and I am distressed that it is not being done well in many corners. There are three concerns: the spread of the virus, the destruction of the economy, and the deterioration of civil liberties.  They are all huge, and how we navigate the current situation is going to be enormous for human well-being in the future.

We must work together and follow proper procedures to defeat this virus.  It is only with the cooperation and sacrifices of all of us that this can be dealt with.  We remember that our actions impact many other people we cannot see.

Poverty kills. We cannot keep food coming without an economy. We cannot keep our healthcare system going without an economy.  When people bring up the economy, some will accused them of prioritizing money over human lives and being willing to kill people for their greed.  Wait a minute here. Think of how we usually work. Can there be any doubt that if we made all cars so they couldn’t go faster than 25 miles per hour that would save lives? Think of how many terrible accidents would be avoided.  It would inconvenience us and slowly reduce productivity, but it would save lives. Why haven’t people made the same case?  Life does have some risk, and absolute security does not exist on this planet.  We can have the discussion of how we balance the risks and the harms of the decisions involved. We don’t have to rule the discussion off limits.

If we are going to destroy someone’s life’s work, hope and dreams, and reduce them to poverty, they are going to want to ask if the particular rules that do it are necessary for our safety, or if they were just put together arbitrarily. When people think that rules are made that are inconsistent to the point of being capricious, that concern needs to be addressed. When someone says, “You are just being inconvenienced” they are demonstrating a lack of awareness and sensitivity. Some people are being inconvenienced. Some people’s lives are being destroyed.

I’m not a historian, but as I understand it, totalitarian governments often start during a crisis, and, of course take extraordinary steps to deal with it (so far so good).  But then, there continue to be more and more authoritarian decisions that seem less and less necessary to deal with the crisis, but if you question them, you are immediately attacked for being unconcerned about the crisis and the well-being of the nation. It is the nature of human beings that people in power tend to think they should have more power. Our country was founded on limited government with checks and balances to keep this in check, and many countries that did not do this fell into totalitarianism. This was dramatized in George Orwell’s book Animal Farm. If it ever becomes out of bounds to challenge government practices, we are in dangerous territory.

That said, I cannot overemphasize the importance of being responsible when challenging. When people who are protesting details of the lockdown leave their cars and gather close together closely without masks, they are making their opponents’ case for them. When someone says, “If you are afraid you can stay inside, but don’t make everyone else do it.” They are not taking into account that they are affecting more than themselves and risking more than themselves.  They are risking other people they come into contact with. We think of the people who work in grocery stores who can’t control who they come into contact with. We think of the health care workers who have been working long hours and who have not been seeing their families for fear of infecting them.  These are unprecedented times, and strong action is called for, so it would be good to be careful about assuming the worst too easily about our elected officials.

How we deal with this time will have deep and lasting effects on our future. The conversations we have are essential to that.  If we want others to take our concerns seriously, it would help to take their concerns seriously. If we want them to give our motives the benefit of the doubt, it would help to give their motives the benefit of the doubt. May charity rule our hearts.